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Aug 26 2007

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Celebration of First Blackbelts

This is a seminar you don’t want to miss. . . 

On the body there are a great number of accessible entries to nerve structures that will cause a loss of body control, reflexive actions and other disruptive affects on the body’s normal functions.   Typically when attacking the body the results were based on mass, strength and condition, but when attacking the nerves these limitations are no longer as concerning.This special knowledge of accessing the human anatomy is called Kyusho (Okinawan term for Vital Point).  And as all nerves lay between muscle, tendon and bone structures the Art of Uechi Ryu maps and teaches the practitioner how to correctly target these accessible targets, rather than the supportive structures surrounding them.  By using the pre-arranged training drill of Dan Kumite, this powerful knowledge is quickly and easily assimilated, yield much more effect and potential in your Art.

In an article from Dragon Times with Shinyu Gushi Sensei on Kyusho in Uechi Ryu…

Dragon Times: When you were learning karate as a young student, did the seniors teach you kyusho (nerve points)?


Shinyu Gushi: Yes. We learned from our seniors and teachers but not to use in the dojo of course, it’s too dangerous. Also we were not allowed to use them from the time of the first dan grading I told you about because they are so dangerous.

In Modern times we have eliminated the danger yet retained the powerful aspects of Kyusho… and as a Martial Arts enthusiast, and especially with Uechi Ryu, I am excited and honored you to tell you about a Uechi-Ryu/Kyusho Seminar coming to Massachusetts this November 17th & 18th, 2007 and instructed by Jim Hulse 7th Dan Uechi-Ryu, from the Untited Kingdom.

His easy to understand instructional qualities and easy going manner will bring the Kyusho to life in Drill for, using Dan Kumite.

Jim has been deeply engrossed in the Study of Kyusho as it pertains to his main art of Uechi for many years.  Reaching an excellent level as many have witnessed in seminars and video.  Because of this specialized knowledge and skill, Hulse Sensei has been contracted to teach in several countries around the world.  I am proud to bring him back to New England again for this special seminar;

There are Two Days available in Two locations, you can pick the nearest or attend both for a greater learning experience! One in Natick at Fedel’s Dojo and the other in Tewksbury at Bobby Spoon’s Dojo.

For all the information and times go to this page:   http://www.kyusho.com/uechi-kyusho2007.htm

I hope to see you there and if you have any questions, please do not hesitate to email me at:  evan@kyusho.com

As an additional note, for those of you that have a school or club, this information is being sought by millions worldwide and growing fast. It can be a special addition to your curriculum without changing it, adding additional income from current students, retention of students and even reclaiming old students.

If you are interested in this special type program in your school, we can show you the benefits for you as we have in 35 Countries so far.

I hope to see you there and if you have any questions, please do not hesitate to email me at: evan@kyusho.com

Sincerely,
Evan Pantazi
kyusho.com


gem deep sea fishing Thanks to everyone who sent cards and e-mail, wishing me a happy “70th”! Wow…. Thanks to Roy “Catfish” Bedard, Dr. Dave and “Dee” for inviting me to a two action-filled days and nights of deep sea fishing on the Golf Coast of Florida. I’ll save the Fish Stories for next year’s SummerFest – - Ask me about the Kingfish and Barracuda encounter! I bet Dave Finkelstein could write an article about it. :)

Imagine my surprise to check my mail and view the website on Thursday and find that my wonderful wife had “hacked” into the home page and left the “happy birthday” message! Remember that only a couple years ago she refused to even own a computer. Now she has a mailing list larger than mine!

Thanks to Jay Nussbaum for sending me an advance copy of his new novel, “A Monk Jumped Over a Wall”. I really enjoyed his first book, “Blue Road to Atlantis” and hope to spend the next few evenings reading his latest work.

Later. . .
George Mattson


Happy Birthday, George…
Birthdays are good for you. People that have the most, live the longest.
Have a great fishing trip!
Love, Susan and Tia

Seth Rosenblatt was very busy at SummerFest this year. Besides participating in many of the seminars, Seth was able to take quite a few photographs which he has shared with us. Click on the photograph to view this new SummerFest gallery.
SummerFest 2007 Action
Check out Patty Dando, one of our new Florida Black Belts…


Robert Van Der VolgenRob Meditating! enjoying SummerFest
I just posted over 100 SummerFest photographs, sent to me by Sue Dudley. I mistakenly credited her for pictures that were earlier sent to me by Neil Weicher. If you click on the picture, you will be able to view the new gallery.

Another Terry Bryan moment. . .

The West is famous for being able to make great things better. . . Take “mixed martial arts” as an example . . . and how about adapting our fighting arts into a business model? I’ve written a lot about this subject in the past and thought you might enjoy reading more about the subject, from someone who has mastered the art of using his fighting arts in a multitude of non-fighting areas. GEM

Senryaku – Strategy
by Terry Bryan

The Japanese word Senryaku translates as strategy or tactics. Most people that have a military, martial arts or a successful business background indeed look at thing differently than most people do. While the average person floats through out their life going with the flow and reacting to things as they happen, successful people plan ahead, create a written plan and take action making their goals become a reality.

Some people start thinking about planning and may have a goal but few have back up plans, the plan “B” in case the first choice doesn’t happen. The real successful people have a unique ability of understanding human nature, real information of success patterns and effectiveness of tactics and have action plans developed several levels deep and well thought out.
I see this evident in the modern Mixed Martial Arts programs out there today, but this is not a new concept. The art of blending different martial arts to come up with a system that works best for the practitioner has been the path of successful martial artists for thousands of years.
In the Chinese arts for example, systems were created a student may start learning the Tiger style because they are big and strong but later learn the Crane style to maximize his abilities by adding angles to his fighting style. Similarly, Mohammed Ali added the tactics of the lightweight boxers and took that into the heavyweight division and dominated professional boxing for years with his style of floating like a butterfly, sting like a bee.
In the 60’s and 70’s Bruce Lee pushed heavy the idea of taking what is useful from a style and discarding the rest. I would guess that Bruce would be considered the grandfather of Mixed Martial Arts with his JKD style where he blended western boxing, grappling, stick fighting and a host of other arts to his base Chinese system.
To day we are seeing grapplers begin to study striking arts and many of the striking martial arts are beginning to learn the grappling arts in order to compete against other various fighters under mixed martial arts rules.
The same is true with business success.
Many of the huge breakthroughs have occurred when they have identified something that is very effective in one industry and adapted it to their business. This includes marketing, price points, competitive advantages and even image.
What I really see effective today, is the people that add redundancy to their personal, business and martial arts life. If you have a clearly defined plan of action – what if?
What if it doesn’t happen? What is your plan “B”? And do you have a plan “C”? OK, that is the strategy of black belt excellence, to have a pattern of response that is ready for any situation as it happens, but do you want to know the secrets of the true masters?
Now this is for advance thinking people. That is using pro-activity and systems to eliminate those options in the first place. Knowing that if Plan “A” fails, why not design into your plans the very thing that will prevent the necessity of having to implement plan “B” because you have eliminated in your initial plan.
The most successful people today, have double and even triple redundancy systems set up to avoid any options in their operations. So this week when you do your planning, include a section on what if and back up plans. This will go a long way of helping you take your martial arts training, personal life and even business success to a new level.
To Your Success,
Terry L. Bryan, Instructor American Black Belt Academy


 Jim and kids
 Jim Baggett – New Shodan and one of the Junior
division’s instructor at the Central Florida Martial Arts
Academy. With Jim are his two kids, Connor and Taylor.

Respect. . .

Another great article from Terry Bryan

Of the seven essential principles of bushido, the Japanese word for bowing or “rei” is one of the most important for the true warrior.  Most Americans bastardize the process and just slap their sides in an imitation act of a quick greeting, but the true meaning could take a little more care and effort to do it correctly. I am sure I am not alone when I see the crude behavior and the rudeness of many American martial artists as they do a rough superficial copy of the act, not having a clue of the intent and purpose of this cultural display of humility and respect. Most don’t even know when or where to bow, let alone know how to do it correctly.

I know, I know… this is old school and the new modern martial artist simple touch gloves or fists and “Get It On”. And I guess that’s ok, if you are teaching a new modern martial arts and not calling your art karate. But for those claiming to teach a traditional based art – well – give me a break. Do your homework. You have a responsibility to know the truth and share that truth with your students. If you don’t believe in bowing fine, but if you are going to do it in your school, then dog-gone-it … do it right.

Of the seven essential principles of bushido, the Japanese word for bowing or “rei” is one of the most important for the true warrior.  Most Americans bastardize the process and just slap their sides in an imitation act of a quick greeting, but the true meaning could take a little more care and effort to do it correctly. I am sure I am not alone when I see the crude behavior and the rudeness of many American martial artists as they do a rough superficial copy of the act, not having a clue of the intent and purpose of this cultural display of humility and respect. Most don’t even know when or where to bow, let alone know how to do it correctly. I know, I know… this is old school and the new modern martial artist simple touch gloves or fists and “Get It On”. And I guess that’s ok, if you are teaching a new modern martial arts and not calling your art karate. But for those claiming to teach a traditional based art – well – give me a break. Do your homework. You have a responsibility to know the truth and share that truth with your students. If you don’t believe in bowing fine, but if you are going to do it in your school, then dog-gone-it … do it right.

I once read a story about respect and the message by analogy was that the rice stalk that carried the most grain bent the lowest. I find that in the martial arts, there seems to be a similar truth. It has been my experience that the most senior and respected teachers are the most humble and respectful beings around. They understand that respect is not something one can demand, but is earned by showing respect to others. The very act of taking time to recognize another and showing that you recognize them and appreciate their being is an act in humility all in itself.
There is a natural law that I call the law of the farm. This law specifies that in order to get, you must first give. In order to get respect from others, you must first give respect. On a farm you plant seed in the spring, work the crop during the summer, and harvest in the fall. You can’t skip the first part and expect results in the fall, nor can you rush this process by pulling on the stalk during the summer. There are those that sit in front of a stove and think that once it heats up, then they will add wood to the fire. That process just doesn’t work, and yet everyday, products are sold and bought that promise instant gratification with no effort needed.
Even in the martial arts world, there are those who promise instant security, a six-month black belt, or deadly abilities in only a few lessons. Anyone who understands natural laws, must realize that quality martial arts takes many years, a lot of hard work and dedication to a good organization and teacher. Every time you bow in the dojo, you should understand that you have identified this process and are earning your proficiency the old fashion way – through hard work, discipline and respect.
Many senior teachers have realized that simply teaching fighting tactics or strategies, without including the philosophical and spiritual attributes of respect, humility and self-discipline, is doing nothing more than creating street-fighters. In classical martial arts, the training of the entire person, mentally, spiritually and physically, is the goal of the teacher. One of the major first steps towards becoming a great warrior is learning how to bow properly.
A couple of key points to a traditional bow and my opinions why. First of all, you stand up straight, heels together, feet together turned outwards at a 45 degree angle, back straight, hands to your side.
Why all the detail? Because it shows discipline, correct posture and respect, that’s why. In all things in life there is one way to do things right, some things that are ok, and most things that are just wrong. A true warrior always strives for doing the things right, not a sloppy imitation that is good enough. Imagine going into a life and death encounter thinking that second place is good enough.
Next step, back straight and bend forward to a 45 degree angle, come to a complete stop, hold for a second, keeping your eyes straight so that you are now looking down at a 45 degree angle too, then return to starting position before doing anything else.
Bending the body forward to a 45 degree angle shows respect and trust.
Coming to a clear stop before returning to the starting position teaches the student that if you start something, finish it.
Keeping your eyes focused straight ahead, teaches the student to develop their peripheral vision in order to see everything around them, even though they have lowered their eyes.
A simple procedure, yet almost always screwed up in the majority of martial arts schools in America today, where the tradition has come to be – teach quick, collect cash fast, and good enough is good enough in everything. And lets not forget, taking credit for everything as your own invention and giving no credit to your teachers, the history or culture from which your art came from. Better to just make up some damn story.
OK, maybe I am old fashioned. Maybe I am outdated.
But then again…
Maybe each of us should go and look in the mirror and ask a simple question.
Am I doing everything I can to become the best martial artist I can and have I done everything I can to make sure what I am teaching is true?
Now I bet that if you are honest with yourself, you will answer either yes, or no. And I bet is you responded yes… well quite honestly you are probably lying. Come on, how long would it take you to list 10 things you can do right now to improve yourself? How many more have you blown off, or just not got around to doing?
If you stand in front of the class of students as their Sensei, Sifu, Guru, Sabunim… have you done everything you can to deserve to be the role model they need?
Humm… interesting questions in your pursuit of black belt excellence isn’t it?
To Your Success,
Terry L. Bryan, warriorwiz


 

more pictures8/30/2007… More Pictures
from last Saturday’s Celebration at the Central Florida Martial Art Academy.
Thanks to Kim for taking these great shots! (click on picture to view)

NOTE: I’ve received quite a few e-mail regarding the broken links in the “Articles” section. After a weekend of working on this section, I am happy to report that nearly all links have been restored. GEM


Celebration of First Blackbelts

 

by Roy Bedard
[click on picture to view photos by Kevin McEwen ]
black belts

promotion

Sensei George Mattson and Sensei David Berndt held their first Black Belt promotional awards ceremony, Saturday August 25 at the Central Florida Martial Arts Center in Eustis.

The promotional was preceded by a demonstration of karate skills by Central Florida youth who were also awarded higher “kyu” (under black belt) ranks after many months of training in the classical art of Okinawan Uechi-Ryu Karate.

Along with demonstrating the physical skills of karate, the children were asked several questions by a panel of black belt examiners to ascertain that their training and experience is promoting a positive whole life experience. “ Why do you study karate?”, asked Patty Dando. “It makes me calm and I feel calm when I do it”, said one 8 year old  candidate, “What has karate done for you in your life?” asked Jim Baggett. “It has giving me control and discipline said  another 14 year old student at Mount Dora High School.

Parents and friends looked  on proudly as the demonstration was underway

The Central Florida Martial Arts Center opened its doors to local youth and adult participants three years ago in the Eustis Square Mall. Since that time the Center has attracted Black belts from around the state and nation who are part of a larger International Uechi-Ryu Karate Federation (IUKF).

Uechi-Ryu karate, recently featured on the History Channel’s  “Human Weapon” is a powerful Okinawan/Chinese  martial arts system  which provides power with grace as it develops focus, concentration and technical prowess for older and younger students alike.

Sensei George Mattson’s first students at the new dojo, Tim Dando, Jim Baggett and Patty Dando, were tested at this year’s SummerFest in New England. All three passed with high honors.

timLeft: Tim Dando is presented with his Shodan certificate from IUKF President, George Mattson. Tim is responsible for talking George into teaching him Uechi-ryu, when George first moved to Florida. Soon afterwards, Tim’s friend, Jim, asked to train. It wasn’t long afterwards that Tim and Jim’s whole family started to train.

Bottom left, row 1: Michael Vena (Tampa, FL) receives his Shodan certificate from IUKF President, George Mattson. [Michael’s teacher is Kevin Brice]
Bottom right, row 1: Sensei Joe Guidry (newly promoted to 7th dan by sensei Gushi) take two of his students through Sanchin kata.
Bottom left, row 2: George Mattson tests Mac Hutchinson (14 years old) for his Nikyu rank, which he passed.
Bottom right, row 2: Tim, Jim and Patty, along with the newly promoted yellow belt juniors, demonstrate the multi-attack Konshiwa Bunkai for their parents.

 kids celebration  kids celebration
 kids  kids

Of the seven essential principles of bushido, the Japanese word for bowing or “rei” is one of the most important for the true warrior.  Most Americans bastardize the process and just slap their sides in an imitation act of a quick greeting, but the true meaning could take a little more care and effort to do it correctly. I am sure I am not alone when I see the crude behavior and the rudeness of many American martial artists as they do a rough superficial copy of the act, not having a clue of the intent and purpose of this cultural display of humility and respect. Most don’t even know when or where to bow, let alone know how to do it correctly. I know, I know… this is old school and the new modern martial artist simple touch gloves or fists and “Get It On”. And I guess that’s ok, if you are teaching a new modern martial arts and not calling your art karate. But for those claiming to teach a traditional based art – well – give me a break. Do your homework. You have a responsibility to know the truth and share that truth with your students. If you don’t believe in bowing fine, but if you are going to do it in your school, then dog-gone-it … do it right.

Permanent link to this article: http://uechi-ryu.com/celebration-of-first-blackbelts/

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